Global Energy Monitor

Iconic zones

Each “iconic zone” is selected according to the suggestions from environmental NGOs worldwide. The boundaries of these zones can be at a provincial level, national level, or cover multiple countries, depending on the focus of local campaigns. 

The aims of featuring these zones on the tracker are: 1) to carefully understand the opportunities and challenges in developing renewable energy in these zones, and 2) to showcase examples and the ongoing progress of energy transition, inspiring similar initiatives at the local level.

Features

Each iconic zone is equipped with the following features:

  • An energy map.
  • Topical summaries on social, economic, and environmental aspects.
  • Dashboards presenting critical energy data and development trends.
  • List of references to pivotal online platforms or reports for a deeper comprehension of the zone.

Underpinning each zone is a dedicated profile , hosted on GEM.wiki, embedded on the official website. This wiki page is a footnoted fact sheet comprising information about current and prospective energy data, energy policy and targets, land availability for renewable development, social and environmental impact, transmission infrastructure, ownership of energy projects, and financial support mechanisms for energy development.

Research

GEM researchers rely on public sources of information:  

  • Governmental websites, press releases, reports, assessments, and policy papers.
  • Websites, press releases, reports, and assessments from intergovernmental organizations and multinational institutions.
  • Reports and research from international and local non-governmental organizations.
  • Status reports or new releases from energy companies and industrial institutions.
  • Other news and information from reputable media sources.

All information is cited and linked to its source and is accessible to the public online.

Where possible, the wiki pages are supported or reviewed by NGO partners. Reviewers and collaborators include: 350.org, Beyond Fossil Fuel, E3G, Tara Foundation, UMI Fund, Renewable Energy Institute Japan, Stockholm Environment Institute Colombia, Global Wind Energy Council (GWEC), TransitionZero, Friends of the Earth, People of Asia for Climate Solutions (PACS), CAN International, Europe Climate Foundation, and The Initiative for Social Performance in Renewable Energy (INSPIRE).

As our platform evolves and expands, the reviewers and collaborators list will be extended.

Scope of Tracked Energy

The tracker monitors two primary energy categories: fossil fuels and renewable energy. Within the fossil fuel domain, it tracks coal-fired power plants and oil- and gas-fired power plants. At the local level, specific attention is given to the geographical coordinates of coal mines and oil and gas extraction sites. For renewable energy, the tracker focuses on solar and wind energy projects. 

Energy capacity data is tracked at the plant level. The information presented on the website includes the name of the plant, location, fuel type or technology type, installed capacity, operating status, start year of operation, owner and operator companies of the plant, information about each unit or phase, and a link to the GEM.wiki page for the plant. 

The data presented in this tracker is sourced from energy trackers hosted by Global Energy Monitor. Each tracker is updated twice yearly to track the energy landscape globally. In-depth information and methodology are available at the following links:

Who Built this Tool?

This tracker was made possible by the efforts and contributions of GEM’s research team: Hailey Deres, Julie Macuga, Zhanaiym Kozybay, Andrew Gamez, Janna Smith, and Gregor Clark, as well as support from GEM’s Renewables & Other Power team. GEM also appreciates the guidance and ongoing support of our NGO partners, including 350.org, Beyond Fossil Fuel, E3G, Tara Foundation, UMI Fund, Renewable Energy Institute Japan, Stockholm Environment Institute Colombia, Global Wind Energy Council (GWEC), TransitionZero, Friends of the Earth, People of Asia for Climate Solutions (PACS), CAN International, Europe Climate Foundation, and The Initiative for Social Performance in Renewable Energy (INSPIRE). Their collective efforts contributed significantly to the development of the Global Energy Transition Tracker.